Monday, July 20, 2015

Who Has the Right of Way at a Four Way Stop in Nevada?



You are approaching a four way stop, and you and another car get to the intersection at the exact same time. Let’s assume you are being a nice person and you wave the other person to go first. But, the other person is waving for you to go first! Who really has the right of way to go first? It is the person on the “right” and is set forth in NRS 484B.250:

NRS 484B.250  Vehicle approaching or entering intersection.
      1.  The driver of a vehicle approaching an intersection shall yield the right-of-way to a vehicle which has entered the intersection from a different highway.
      2.  When two vehicles enter an intersection from different highways at approximately the same time, the driver of the vehicle on the left shall yield the right-of-way to the vehicle on the right.
      3.  When two vehicles enter an intersection at approximately the same time, one vehicle traveling on a highway which ends at the intersection and the other vehicle traveling on a through highway, the driver of the vehicle on the highway which ends at the intersection shall yield the right-of-way to the other vehicle.
      4.  When a vehicle enters an intersection controlled by a traffic-control signal which is installed and has its vehicular signals uncovered, but is inoperative at the time the vehicle enters the intersection, the driver of the vehicle shall proceed as if a stop sign had been erected at each entrance to the intersection and shall stop at a clearly marked stop line or, if there is none, before entering the crosswalk on the near side of the intersection or, if there is none, at the point nearest the intersection where the driver has a view of approaching traffic on the through highway. After making such a stop, the driver shall proceed cautiously, yielding to vehicles which have previously completed a stop or are within the intersection.
      5.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 4, this section does not apply at intersections controlled by official traffic-control devices or to vehicles approaching each other from opposite directions, when the driver of one of the vehicles is intending to or is making a left turn.
 


But what happens if you are directly across from each other? The statute doesn’t discuss this scenario! So, one of you will have to go first. 

However, keep in mind that whoever is proceeding into the intersection first, has the right of way and other cars must yield to them. So, if you believe you got to the intersection first and then stopped. But, then another car whom you believe arrived at the intersection after you, goes through the intersection, you must take reasonable steps to avoid an accident and you must wait for the car to pass.


Next time, we will discuss how hospital bills get paid after a car accident.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

What Are the Laws on Yielding to Emergency Vehicles in Nevada?


When an ambulance or other emergency is on the road and they are involved in a car accident, the outcome can be catastrophic, due to the high speeds in which emergency vehicles tend operate. When an ambulance or other emergency vehicle is on the roadway, they have to follow certain rules before ‘breaking’ the normal traffic laws. These rules are set forth in Nevada Revised Statutes (“NRS”) 484B, entitled “Rules of the Road”.  The relevant sections of NRS 484B are laid out below:

NRS  484B.700  Privileges granted to driver of authorized emergency vehicle, official vehicle of regulatory agency or vehicle escorting funeral procession; application of privileges; limitation of privileges.


      1.  The driver of an authorized emergency vehicle or an official vehicle of a regulatory agency, when responding to an emergency call or when in pursuit of an actual or suspected violator of the law or when responding to but not upon returning from a fire alarm, or a vehicle escorting a funeral procession, may:
      (a) Proceed past a red or stop signal or stop sign, but only after slowing down as may be necessary for safe operation.
      (b) Exceed any speed limits so long as the driver does not endanger life or property, except that a vehicle escorting a funeral procession may not exceed the speed limit by more than 15 miles per hour to overtake the procession and direct traffic at the next intersection.
      (c) Disregard regulations governing direction of movement or turning in specified directions. The driver of a vehicle escorting a funeral procession may direct the movements of the vehicles in the procession in a similar manner and may direct the movements of other vehicles.
      2.  The privileges granted in subsection 1 apply only when the vehicle is making use of:
      (a) Audible and visual signals; or
      (b) Visual signals only, as required by law.
      3.  The driver of an authorized emergency vehicle or an official vehicle of a regulatory agency may park or stand without regard to the provisions of chapters 484A to 484E, inclusive, of NRS, if the driver makes use of a warning lamp.
      4.  The provisions of this section do not relieve the driver from the duty to drive with due regard for the safety of all persons and do not protect the driver from the consequences of the driver’s reckless disregard for the safety of others.

What are Emergency Vehicles Allowed to Do?


    •    Emergency vehicles can drive faster than the speed limit.
    •    When approaching a stop sign or red light, emergency vehicles do not have to stop, as long as it safe to proceed.
    •    Drivers of Emergency Vehicles can drive on the ‘wrong’ side of the road.
    •    They must still use Due Care to avoid causing accidents. 


 Next time, we will discuss who has the right of way at a four way stop.